Notes from Tango Tribe class Wednesday 1/27/2016

Dance International Studio
(David Phillips substituting for Jason Laughlin of Tangophilia)
Guided experiences to help you make personal and partner discoveries

First session, 6:00-7:30pm, Core concepts
Tonight’s topic: Your balance. Protecting your axis and telling your partner clearly where it is.

We do core concepts exercises from both sides of the embrace, in such a way that everybody can handle it.

Warmup exercises from Move Like a Champion

  • Put a Spring in Your Step (Bouncing on the Heels)
  • Run Baby Run (Walking and Jogging in Place)
  • Feet with Attitude (Shaping the Free Foot)
  • Barbie Feet (Standing on the Platform)

Preparatory exercise: Saying “No”
Standing both legs, each leg, organized body, loose body. Moving.

Slow walking, with observable sensation-based feedback
Taking turns with follower’s eyes closed.

Slow walking with follower missteps, leader missteps

Review findings – strategies for protecting your axis and staying with your partner

  • NOT “changing the shape” of the axis. I.e., dropping a hip or curving in the vertical.
  • NOT swiveling the hips. (Turns our belly button “centerline” away from partner and line of travel, and leads to crossing our tracks.)
  • Keep a toned (not rigid, NOT loose) body, with an active ankle.
  • Reposition feet. E.g., quick shuffle steps to a better place, while leaving myself on the same original leg.
  • Turning the belly button to the partner. I.e., keep the pelvic “bowl” level and pointing in the direction (or 180-degrees) of travel.
  • Putting down the kickstand. Using free leg for support or counter-weight.
  • Releasing the partner. Give them their axis/Let them find their axis in a bigger space.

With all that in mind, let’s dance.

Second session, 7:30-9:00pm, Improvisation and interpretation
Tonight’s topic: Cambio de Frente variations. Exchanging places with your partner.

Here we will apply what we learned in the previous session about our axis, adding the element of major pivoting.

How many different ways can I change places with my partner, especially in a small space? Which of those are useful? What would I have to adjust to make the easy ones better and the hard ones easy? How can I easily multiply the possibilities?

We’ll start with ideas for how to work with a partner, exploring together and sharing observable sensation-based feedback.

We’ll work in groups exploring ideas, bring good ones back to everyone to share, learn new ones or perfect old ones.

Review findings – strategies for exploring with a partner the creation of new movement figures

  • With each of the options (indicated by “/”), know that movements may be easier/harder and require adjustment in one or another.
  • Two-way feedback throughout with observable sensory-based feedback.
  • Both contributing ideas.
  • Working in pieces, like snapshots of positions, can help.
  • Moving slowly / with momentum.
  • Work in open / close / flexible embrace.
  • Work from the end to beginning. Can be employed for creativity / at any sticking point.
  • I move around partner’s axis / partner moves around my axis / we move around a third axis.
  • Stepping to open (hand) / closed (arm) side of embrace.
  • Stepping in parallel-system / cross-system.
  • Stepping in parallel-direction / cross-direction.
  • Step with left / right / no foot (i.e., I remain in place while leading a step via contra body movement).
  • Step / lead step around / parallel / away from.
  • Pivoting before stepping.
  • Step with rebound / full step.
  • Move together / hold in place – myself / my partner.

With all we’ve created, let’s dance.

Slouching toward greatness

SUMMARY: Make everyday living your practice time.
The point isn’t that we fail; that’s an essential part of human choice, striving, and learning. The point is to celebrate all those times we try. And when we try on a regular basis, as part of our lifestyle, to embody the spirit and the impeccable technique of what we want to achieve, then we move toward greatness.

OVER A MEAL with a group of teachers discussing practice habits, I told how I suggest to students that rather than (or better yet, in addition to) the sometimes difficult goal of carving out dedicated practice time in a busy schedule, we can make practice of tango technique part of our daily life.

But one of our group opined, “They won’t do it. Except for a very few highly motivated students, they don’t practice, even if you make it as simple as that.”

But that isn’t the point, now is it? The point isn’t how many students can’t, don’t, won’t embrace useful advice, but rather how many can, do, and will, even if only sometimes!

You’re walking around the house, going from the house to the car and back, going from the car to the store or office and back. How much time would it add if rather than ambling from place to place we instead power walked with exquisite tango technique? I’m thinking we’d actually get places faster. How many strange looks or even comments would we get from observers, and would we care? I’m thinking we might occasionally meet interesting people and strike up good conversations.

Instead of stepping around the corners and doorways of our home and office, how much more fun could we have if we turned with nice dissociation and a sharp pivot, perhaps with an enrosque or boleo thrown in for relish?

Heck, it can be even simpler than that. You’re in a private lesson or a group class or a workshop for an hour or more, and just think how often you see people either standing around listening or moving about repositioning to make another practice pass, get to a clear space, or restart a pattern sequence. Does it make sense to start a figure from a standstill; do you do that when dancing? When you find yourself boxed in or facing out of the line of dance at a milonga are you going to shuffle yourself and your partner around to reposition?

In my spirit the dance floor is akin to the martial arts dojo where, as you enter you make a sign of respect, and all the time you are on the mat/dance floor you behave with respect, to the art and yourself and your others. You move at all times (every time you remember) as if you were on display as a model for the best example of what you want to become. You provide an impeccable example for others, because whether you are the teacher or a student, others are watching and learning (whether for good or ill) from you.

But now the point isn’t about insisting that our students or we ourselves must practice or move with such awareness and intention throughout our day. If we berate ourselves for missing a practice or forgetting to be mindful about our movements, that associates negative feelings with the activity. Negative feelings hurt, and we are hardwired to avoid pain. As often as anything we can wind up suppressing altogether the practice or activity or intention, just so we don’t create negative feelings.

The point is to CELEBRATE and thoroughly enjoy those times that we DO become aware of and act on our good intentions. I am now sitting at my computer with a nice tango posture all the way from the crown of my head down to my sit bones, no longer slouching; “Hey, cool! This is how I want to look when I am dancing. This is how a tanguero looks. Yay for me!”

Walking around the corner of my desk I feel a jolt of inspiration to spiral my body to a full turn pivot with enrosque. “I am so lucky that I have these opportunities to innocently and creatively play with myself throughout the day. Yay me!”

So, leave your students (and readers) with good ideas, whether or not a few or even any use them often, seldom, or never. At the very least you are helping yourself by reinforcing good, even enjoyable habits.

Abrazos, mis amigos.
–David