A recipe for beginners??

Does a Recipe this rich and filling seem like something you would feed to a beginner??

This is what we are doing in group classes over August 2018 at Tango Tribe.

52. Alterations With Overturned Forward Ochos With Sacadas

by Christy Coté for DVIDA | Makes 2 phrases | One month of weekly two hours of classes | Gluten-free

Ingredients

Cross System
Displacement
Alteration
Ochos (optionally overturned)
Sacadas (optional), including back sacada (more optional)
Molinete
Tuck and lapiz (optional)
Parada, Pasada
Colgada (optional)
Gancho (optional)

Equipment

Congenial partners
Nice dance floor
Dance shoes (or dance socks on shoes)
A Chef de Cuisine committed to help you succeed

Recipe

Salida (#2) to LOP in CS
Walk, Displacement B/F (R2L)
Alteration f2b FO turning CW BO
Oo, F/F sacada with R
Overturned F ochos: F/Fo sacada with L, F/ Oo sacada with L, F/B sacada with L
Molinete CCW: O/O sacada with R then tuck and lapiz as: BOF
Parada, step-over Colgada to Gancho
FO to Parada

Method

  1. Brief warm up for ankles, hip rotators, and core, plus special attention to movements used in the evening’s special ingredient.
  2. Demonstrate the final product.
  3. Demonstrate the evening’s special ingredient.
  4. Everyone shadow learns the follower’s part.
  5. Everyone follows the part from a visual lead.
  6. Everyone shadow learns the leader’s part.
  7. Everyone leads the part from a visual back lead.
  8. Pair up and practice.
  9. Switch roles and practice.
  10. Apply individual and group guidance.
  11. Switch partners and repeat until done.

Notes

  • Experienced dancers have an opportunity to learn their opposite role in a systematic way.
  • Both followers and leaders experience equal attention to their role and to the complete dancer.
  • We encourage and teach partners how to give each other feedback and help in a supportive way.
  • We find that the richness of the material encourages close attention to instruction and practice work, without demands from the teacher.
  • The first class, Ingredients, pays attention not only to movement mastery, but also to options for entering and exiting, as well as modifying it. This lets novices focus on essentials, while experienced dancers expand their awareness of creative possibilities. Tuesdays 7:30-8:30 p.m.
  • The second class, Recipes, goes deep into dancer principles to successfully blend individual ingredients into a visually appealing product with a great feel. Tasty! Tuesdays 8:30-9:30 p.m.
  • Recommended: make your own notes after class.
  • Recommended: use the practice time Wednesday 7:00-9:00 p.m. at Tango Tribe (and/or other Austin prácticas).

This is what we are doing in group classes over August at Tango Tribe.
Tuesdays 7:30-8:30 Ingredients
Tuesdays 8:30-9:30 Recipes
Wednesdays 7:00-9:0 Practice

Simple rules for Argentine tango

  1. I move naturally, keeping “nose over toes”.
  2. I match energy with the music and with my partner.
  3. I seek to confront (be with and chest facing) my partner.
  4. At each step I may: 1) move my weight from one foot to the other over zero or longer distance, forward, backward, or sideways; or 2) pivot forward or backwards on the ball of my supporting foot; or 3) pause. I may step through or around my partner’s space. My partner may do something different.
  5. We create dance sequences by opening space for our partner to flow into, or closing space to send our partner in another direction.
  6. Between steps my body passes directly over my supporting leg, while my free leg wants to swing near and under my body to give me good balance and a small footprint for any possible next step or pivot.
  7. I may test, but not stress, my partner.
  8. I or my partner may intentionally bend or break any rule for special effect.

Not rules in the sense of codigos for behavior at the milonga social, but a framework, a set of principles for a way of being when dancing Argentine tango.

In eight rules and fewer than 150 words we have a complete system to express the rich complexity of Argentine tango. Well . . .

Until dancers reach some stages of unconscious competence, they tend to spend too much time in “System 2” of the mind (Thinking fast and slow by Daniel Kahneman), the slower, more deliberative, and more logical one. That’s good for disciplined practice time, but when we dance we want to be in the flow of “System 1,” the fast, instinctive, and emotional one. How to reconcile the complexity of the infinite possibilities of Argentine tango with the limitations of the novice mind-body? Simple rules give us an emotional and instinctive feeling for how we want to be when we are dancing.

Would you expand or reduce this set of rules?
Does any rule strike you as just wrong?
I’d love to hear your comments on how you express the Argentine tango system to the curious and to new dancers.


Inspired by Simple Rules: How to Thrive in a Complex World by professors Donald Sull and Kathleen M. Eisenhardt, about how we all use simple rules, shortcuts to manage the complexities of daily live, and how we can intentionally devise simple rules to help us grasp and manage complex systems, such as the dance of Argentine tango. We have a good example of this in the way that General Motors CEO Mary Barra replaced a 10-page employee dress code with two words, “Dress appropriately.”

If at first you don’t succeed …

If at first you don’t succeed, calm down, slow down, take a breath, assess yourself, assess your partner.

I wear hearing aids. When I don’t understand a person’s speech, two things help most. Paradoxically, turning down the volume helps me hear more of the nuances and frequencies that can become overridden and blurred by too much soundscape volume. Second, and it works the same way, when a person speaks slowly to me it helps my brain hear more and gives it more time to sort out everything that is perceives.

Galloping by Dóra Klenovszki
If your partner didn’t respond in the way you expected, do you get louder, bigger with your movements? Do you try doing something different to see if they understand that? STOP!

What is your default setting for evaluating your partner when things don’t go as expected?

  • They are being resistant.
  • They aren’t sensitive enough.
  • They didn’t hear, feel me the first time.
  • They don’t understand, but if I can make them do it, then . . .
  • They are slow, mentally or physically.

Let’s acknowledge that any of those things could actually be a factor. Now ask yourself, are any of those things helped by becoming, louder, more forceful, bigger, trying it a different way?

Well, actually, that last one, “try it a different way,” does actually help, if the difference is:

  • Become more quiet and still.
  • Listen to yourself.
  • Listen to your partner.
  • Have a crystal clear intention for The One Next Thing.
  • Express that one next thing with crystal clarity and simplicity in your own body.
  • Allow your partner to move with your body.

Here is a specific exercise and challenge for you. The next time you feel frustration with a situation, first catalog how your body goes about telling you to feel frustrated.

  • A tightness somewhere in your body — gut, shoulders, jaw?
  • A contortion in your body — raised shoulders or elbows, twisted or tilted head?
  • A change in temperature — flushed chest or face?
  • A voice in your head?
  • Something else?

Now anchor that feeling for future reference, so that you can recognize it sooner the next time, to start the changes that keep it from coming or reduce it.

Take a breath, calm down, assess. Does the frustration feeling diminish?

Make a choice.

  • Do something different now.
  • Do what you’ve always done.
  • Do nothing.

Celebrate that you do have choices. Then, we can surely hope, that you can go on to celebrate that by doing something different (or even nothing) that you receive more useful responses from your partner, which allow you both to go on building in connection and abilities from there.

Point A to point B, Left-Right

The Sunday, February 4, 2018 issue of Parade, the Sunday newspaper supplement, had a couple of articles with notes for teachers of Argentine tango.

Sunday, February 4, 2018 | PARADE.COM

First, in the Personality section Bode Miller, the most decorated US Olympic alpine skier, talked about advice to young skiers. “Ski racing is, fundamentally, a very simple sport. It’s about going from point A to point B quickly. I think it’s easy to get distracted and start thinking that you have to look a certain way or have to do a certain thing.”

Argentine tango (escenario, stage/performance tango aside) relies on natural, functional movements. It’s either shifting our weight from one foot to the other (forward/backward/sideways, over a long/short/no distance, walking/momentary), or it’s pivoting over a foot. Teachers can confuse and drive away newcomers by insistence on a particular posture, look, manner, and style of walking. Let’s first get them moving comfortably and naturally alone and then with a partner.

Then in the Ask Marilyn column Marilyn Vos Savant weighed in on gender differences in left-right confusion. Let us as teachers make it simpler for all (including ourselves) regardless of gender or left-right awareness, by avoiding relative references (“My left or your left?”) altogether. I like talking about the hand-side of the embrace or the arm-side of the embrace. These are clear and obvious, and the same for either partner.

I’m still looking for the best way to refer to Inside-Outside positions. You are aware that it changes relative to which partner is stepping into the space, yes? “Is that inside/outside the circle (la ronda),” and “Is that outside the inside of my partner?” The DVIDA syllabus refers to LOP (Left Outside Position) and ROP (Right Outside Position), which have the benefit of being unambiguous for either partner stepping in any direction, but also have the left-right possible confusion factor.

When it’s necessary/useful to orient students in the room we prefer to have them face or face their back to some prominent feature of the room (our front windows, the mirrors, the paintings, the Exit sign).

Setting up la ronda: “Everyone spread out to the edges of the floor, with equal space between you and the person on either side of you. Raise your right hand to point to the person on your right side. [Right, it’s not perfect.] Now turn to face in that direction.”